Lily Whitemoore

Description:

Name: Lily Whitemoore, Female, Age: 27, Stage Actor Stage Actor Notes: Actors are skilled at disguising their emotions (when they wish to) and are difficult to analyze with Psychology. Lies and hidden motivations escape detection as the actor weaves a false reality for himself and others.. STR 11 CON 8 SIZ 15 INT 12 POW 13 DEX 13 APP 17 EDU 17 SAN 65 HP 12 Magic 13 Idea 60% Luck 65% Know 85% Armor:—Move: 8 Damage Bonus: +1D4 SKILLS Art 80%, Disguise 75%, English 85%, Fast Talk 70%, Persuade 86%, Knife 65%, Listen 65%, Pick Pocket 41%, Psychology 60% EQUIPMENT Dagger, $2.50 Steamer Trunk (55 lbs.), $13.95 Umbrella, $1.79 Cigarettes (per pack), $0.10 Total Equipment Cost: $18.34 Income: $771, Cash on Hand: $386, Securities: $386, Property: $3,084, Assets: $3,856 PERSONAL DATA CONTACTS Theatre Industry Newspaper Critics Actor’s Guild

Bio:

HISTORY Lily Rosenhall is an enigma, sometimes even to herself. Not everyone has had it easy these last few years, as she’s willing to remind anyone within earshot. This classically trained British actress has seen better days. She arrived on a liner from London in 1915. Broadway had been famous, world-wide for years and the market was only getting bigger each year. Beautiful and talented Lily was ready to conquer the American stage with her savings and steamer trunk. Once arriving on Ellis island and passing through immigration she found a place to stay at a local hotel, imagining that she would find work quickly. After working in a minor role for several plays she realized her posh lifestyle needed to be adjusted and she moved into a lower west side apartment. in 1917 she had a starring role in Maytime, which ran for two years. The next two years were difficult, suddenly truly breaking through and arriving on the Broadway scene meant a constant string of parties, press shoots and other public activities. Lily dived in with reckless abandon, and was the toast of the town for a good six months in 1917. By early 1918 she had difficulty attending several performances, due to hangovers and general unpreparedness. She talked her way back into the good graces of the theatre management only to disappear for days at a time while on wild party binges. The partying continued after she lost her role to Peggy Wood in 1918, and even went into 1920 when she was summarily evicted for non-payment on her apartment. Lily had hit the lowest point of her life. While she managed to beg by on friends for a while, eventually their patience for her drunken antics wore thin and her friends evaporated into the night. Lost, homeless and without any income on the cusp of the Great Depression she began trying to pool resources to return home to London where her parents had promised to help take care of her. She returned to her favorite speakeasy for one last thrill before her boat sailed the next day. She awoke in a state of complete upheavel beside a factory worker from Kansas who was in town on vacation. She had missed her boat by hours and was trapped. Taking to the streets and leaving the wretched-smelling man behind she wandered aimlessly for some hours, dragging her trunk of posessions along behind her. Eventually she sat down and simply cried. She had no friends left, and had missed her best opportunity to return home. It was here that Father Michael found her, sitting on her trunk with her head in her hands. He sat down beside her and talked with her for a few minutes. He explained that he was doing his rounds in the neighborhood, as everyone seemed in desperate need of salvation in days like these. He asked her to return with him to the church where she could spend the night on one of the pews, a practice that many had taken to in recent cold nights. That night bundled up with a borrowed blanket and pillow and after taking a long shower Lily stared up at the vaulting ceiling of the church and carefully considered her options. When morning came she awoke to the sound of Father Michael and his altar-boy Theodore walking down the aisle with a steaming pot of porridge. She and the seven other folk who’d remained inside the church the night before were ladled out bowls of the gobby stuff. Afterwards each in turn took their leave, but Lily stayed behind. “I can sing, I can sing beautifully.” She explained to Father Michael. “I could sing in your choir, your church has a choir doesn’t it?” He regarded her thoughtfully. “I will consider it, but first you need to earn your keep.” He replied. “The Lord helps those who help themselves.” Over the next few months Lily adopted many of the responsibilities of a cleaning woman. She swept floors, mopped and helped cook for the congregation. When she sang she was like an angel, and when she worked she swore like the devil. One time she was caught by the father with a bottle of gin that she’d purchased with wages she’d carefully saved. The priest slapped her so hard she thought she might have a concussion and when the stars cleared from her eyes Father Michael was leaving her room with the bottle in tow. Something about the sudden ferocity of the normally docile priest steeled her against her biggest vice, and she’s been staying well away from it since. Today Lily remains at the Church on Green street, her parents are aware of her and that at the moment at least she is quite happy.

Lily Whitemoore

Astrum es Vox Jicklet